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WomanMany young women have to deal with a roller coaster of emotions when it comes to the decision of whether or not to have breast reduction surgery. Consider a recent article for the Daily Californian titled “Confessions of a breast reduction.”

Kelsi Krandel of the Daily Californian writes, “It’s safe to say that by the age of 18, I had gotten used to that heart-sinking feeling that accompanied dressing rooms. It should have been perfect. The beach-chic high-low dress would make my legs look long and flow behind me like a superhero’s cape. On the hanger it had been everything I’d been looking for. Yet when I stared at myself in the mirror, my eyes fixated on the scoop neck, on the bodice that refused to hit my waist as it was supposed to, and on my giant monster rack that was ruining everything. That time staring in the mirror should have been no different than any other. I was used to feelings of disappointment when I tried to venture outside of my cage of V-neck shirts and A-line dresses. I was used to that heavy-looking reflection. But for some reason, as I looked at myself in that high-low dress, some sort of resolve solidified within me. I held my phone up to the mirror and took a picture in the harsh fluorescent lighting, documenting what would become the ‘before’ picture. I refused to look this way again. The boob issue, as I call it professionally, was never an out-of-the-blue one for me. I come from generations of heavy-chested women. I got my first training bra in the fourth grade and my first real bra in the fifth. By the time I hit senior year of high school, I was wearing 32DDD bras that were too small. I couldn’t buy colorful department store sports bras if I wanted anything resembling support. While my friends joyfully shopped at the women’s swimwear section at Target that I had long outgrown, I blew money on special-ordered bra-sized swimsuits. I looked big in pictures despite being a very active and fit teenage girl. My dance costumes, which were built to fit chicken eggs instead of cantaloupes, left me feeling awkward and exposed.”

If you’re considering breast reduction surgery, you need a surgeon you can trust. Rex E. Moulton-Barrett, M.D. is internationally known and acknowledged. He is board certified with The American Board of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and The American Board of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

With Dr. Moulton-Barrett, breast reduction is performed under general anesthesia. It takes about three to four hours and usually requires an overnight stay.

Considering breast reduction? Contact Dr. Moulton-Barrett for a consultation.